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Can Medicare take your house?

Introduction


If you are on Medicare and are considering inheriting a house or any other asset, it is very important to know what your rights as an heir are. If someone dies with assets and has no probate, then Medicare cannot take those assets because they do not belong to the estate of that person.


However, if there is a probate process in place for their estate then Medicare can try to take those assets as part of that process. It is important to note that if all the owners of a house (or other assets) are on Medicare then the government can take it because it does not belong solely to one person.

  • If all the owners of a house are on Medicare, then Medicare can take the house if it is an asset belonging to the estate of a deceased person.

  • If all the owners of a house are on Medicare, then Medicare can take the house if it is an asset belonging to the estate of a deceased person.

  • If one owner is not on Medicare, but other owners are on Medicare and there is no other asset that could be sold to pay for their long-term care costs, then Medicare can take the house.

  • If all owners are not on Medicare, but some or all owners are on Medicaid (and thus would have access to Medicaid’s “spend down” provisions), then there may be little reason for a state Medicaid agency to pursue any recovery action against your home.

  • If the house is jointly owned or if there are other people who have ownership, Medicare has no right to take the house.

  • If you and your spouse have a house jointly, Medicare cannot take that house. If you own the home with someone else, even if they are your child or grandchild, Medicare cannot take the house. This is because property ownership is a right given to every American citizen by our constitution. And as such, an agency has no right to take away your constitutional rights if they are not legally obligated to.

When a person dies and their children inherit the home, but they go on Medicare, they do not need to worry that Medicare will try and take the home.


If you are on Medicare and your parents pass away, you do not need to worry that Medicare will try and take the house. If your parent's house is an asset belonging to them, then Medicare will not take it.


However, if you own the house with someone else or jointly with other family members, then Medicare may be able to take it from your estate as part of their portion of the inheritance


Be careful with ownership of your home when going on Medicare


If you're about to enter the Medicare system, it's important for you to know that Medicare has no right to take your house. This is a common misconception that often leads older people with health problems to sell their homes in order to cover medical expenses, but such sales are not required and may be counterproductive.


What does this mean? First off, it means that if there are other people who share ownership of the home (either as co-owners or as tenants in common), then those other parties get first dibs on any proceeds from selling the property before Medicare gets anything. Second, if you own your home outright or have the right of survivorship (which means that when one spouse dies all assets pass directly into the other spouse's name), then they cannot take your home at all because they do not have an interest in it at all; therefore there is nothing left over after sale costs and taxes get paid off.



Conclusion


I hope that this article has helped you understand the complex situation of healthcare and Medicare. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below or reach out directly through this website https://www.uhc.com/member-resources/faq



The short answer is no. Medicare can’t take your house. However, if you are disabled and have been unable to work Medicare is a federal program that provides healthcare coverage to individuals 65 years or older.


Original Medicare coverage is broken into two parts - Part A and Part B - and is accepted by nearly every doctor and hospital in the country. Medicare Part A covers inpatient or hospital stays, while Part B covers outpatient or medical care. Together, Part A and B cover about 80% of the typical healthcare costs old face. This leaves a few significant gaps in coverage.




About Preferred Senior Benefits in Meridian, Idaho


Medicare is a federal program that provides healthcare coverage to individuals 65 years or older. Original Medicare coverage is broken into two parts - Part A and Part B - and is accepted by nearly every doctor and hospital in the country. Medicare Part A covers inpatient or hospital stays, while Part B covers outpatient or medical care. Together, Part A and B cover about 80% of the typical healthcare costs old face. This leaves a few significant gaps in coverage. Medicare Supplement (Medigap) and Medicare Advantage plans are policies designed to help extend coverage, lessen costs and ultimately give beneficiaries peace of mind. If you or someone you know would like more information about how to enroll in Original Medicare or one of the Medicare Advantage plans, call now to speak with a licensed agent (208) 818 2523. We cannot wait to help you learn about your options.




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