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Can Medicare take your assets?

Medicare is a federal health insurance program that provides coverage to millions of Americans, including those over 65 years of age, people with disabilities, and those with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). While Medicare does not generally take your assets, there are a few circumstances where it can.


Seniors looking up Medicare Info about there assets

One such scenario is if you are receiving Medicaid, which is a joint federal and state program that provides health coverage for people with limited income and assets. Medicaid is different from Medicare

and is administered by the states. If you are eligible for Medicaid, the state may consider your assets when determining your eligibility for the program, and your assets may be taken into consideration to help pay for your medical expenses.


Another scenario is if you are receiving long-term care through Medicaid. In this case, your assets may be taken into account to help pay for your care up to a certain limit. However, there are certain assets that Medicaid will not take, such as your primary residence and a limited amount of personal property.


If you have substantial assets, such as a large savings account or investments, you may also face a Medicare Part A premium surcharge. Part A is the hospital insurance component of Medicare, and if your income is higher than a certain limit, you may have to pay a higher premium for Part A coverage.


Additionally, if you have a Medicare Advantage plan, you may have to pay a premium for your coverage, which is different from the premium for traditional Medicare. This premium may be higher if your income is above a certain limit, and your assets may be taken into account when determining your premium.

Seniors looking up Medicare Info about how the VA works with Medicare

It is important to note that Medicare does not take your assets if you die. The assets you leave behind do not go to Medicare but instead, may be passed on to your beneficiaries.


In conclusion, Medicare does not generally take your assets, but there are a few circumstances where it can. If you are eligible for Medicaid or receive long-term care through Medicaid, your assets may be taken into consideration to help pay for your medical expenses. Additionally, if you have substantial assets, you may face a Part A premium surcharge or a higher premium for your Medicare Advantage plan. If you have questions about how your assets may be affected by Medicare, it is best to consult with a financial planner or Medicare specialist.


Seniors having tea talking about how Medicare works

About Preferred Senior Benefits in Meridian, Idaho


Medicare is a federal program that provides healthcare coverage to individuals 65 years or older. Original Medicare coverage is broken into two parts—Part A and Part B—and is accepted by nearly every doctor and hospital in the country.


Medicare Part A covers inpatient or hospital stays, while Part B covers outpatient or medical care. Together, Part A and B cover about 80% of the typical healthcare costs seniors face. This leaves a few significant gaps in coverage. Medicare Supplement (Medigap) and Medicare Advantage plans are policies designed to help extend coverage, lessen costs, and ultimately give beneficiaries peace of mind. If you or someone you know would like more information about how to enroll in Original Medicare or one of the Medicare Advantage plans, call now to speak with a licensed agent (208) 818-2523. We can’t wait to help you learn about your options.


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